Maternal Immunoglobulin A regulates the development of the neonatal microbiota and intestinal microbiota-specific CD4+ T cell responses

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Maternal Immunoglobulin A regulates the development of the neonatal microbiota and intestinal microbiota-specific CD4+ T cell responses

Authors

Abbott, D.; Rai, A. T.; Yang, A.; Cai, Y.; Fabre, S.; Frazer, A. J.; Deschepper, J. D.; Poholek, A. C.; Hand, T.

Abstract

Breast milk is a complex mixture of nutrients and bioactives that promote infant development and decrease the incidence of chronic inflammatory disease. We investigated the role of one milk-derived bioactive, Immunoglobulin A (IgA) on the developing small intestinal microbiota and immune system. We demonstrate that early in life, milk-derived IgA suppressed colonization of the small intestine by Enterobacteriaceae and regulated the maturation of the small intestinal epithelium and the development of intestinal IL-17-producing CD4+ T cells. Enterobacteriaceae- specific CD4+ T cells, induced in the first weeks of life in the absence of milk-derived IgA, persisted in the intestine as memory T cells that can contribute to inflammatory disease later in life. Our study suggests that milk-derived IgA shapes mucosal immunity by regulating the neonatal microbiota thus preventing the development of long-lived intestinal microbiota-specific T cells.

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