A chromosome-level genome assembly of the varied leaved jewelflower, Streptanthus diversifolius, reveals a recent whole genome duplication

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A chromosome-level genome assembly of the varied leaved jewelflower, Streptanthus diversifolius, reveals a recent whole genome duplication

Authors

Davis, J. T.; Li, Q.; Grassa, C. J.; Davis, M.; Strauss, S. Y.; Gremer, J. R.; Rieseberg, L. H.; Maloof, J. N.

Abstract

The Streptanthoid complex, a clade of primarily Streptanthus and Caulanthus genera in the Thelypodieae tribe (Brassicaceae) is an emerging model system for ecological and evolutionary studies. This Complex spans the full range of the California Floristic Province including desert, foothill, and mountain environments. The ability of these related species to radiate into dramatically different environments makes them a desirable study subject for exploring how plant species expand their ranges and adapt to new environments over time. Ecological and evolutionary studies for this complex have revealed fascinating variation in serpentine soil adaptation, defense compounds, germination, flowering, and life history strategies. Until now a lack of available genomic resources has hindered the ability to relate these phenotypic observations to their underlying genetic and molecular mechanisms. To help remedy this situation we present here a chromosome-level genome assembly of Streptanthus diversifolius, a member of the Streptanthoid Complex, developed using Illumina, Hi-C, and HiFi sequencing technologies. Construction of this assembly also provides further evidence to support the previously reported recent whole genome duplication unique to the Thelypodieae tribe. This whole genome duplication may have provided individuals in the Streptanthoid Complex the genetic arsenal to rapidly radiate throughout the California Floristic Province and to occupy commonly inhospitable environments including serpentine soils.

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